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Buying Guide: Chain or Belt Drive Bike

Posted on Jul 2, 2018

Image Source: Pexels by Luke Mitchell. Due to the progress of manufacturing technologies, the bicycle industry has progressed tremendously. The newest topic of discussion in this category is that of chain drives versus belt drives. Here is what you need to know about the distinctions between the two, as well as some recommendations on what to buy. Belt drives are present on various two-wheelers nowadays, from commuter bikes that are meant for city use to robust mountain bikes that conquer the trails. Indoor bicycles also make use of this equipment, as it brings many advantages to a home workout. Even motorcycles come with belt drives nowadays, which shows just how pervasive the technology is. Chain Drive vs Belt Drive An article published by Gizmodo back in 2008 boldly stated that chain drive bikes were becoming a thing of the past, while belt drives were taking the forefront. Ten years later, it is safe to say that this indeed happened. Even though many bikes still sport a chain drive, more and more companies have reoriented their lines toward the better...

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KNEE PAIN, KNEE ALIGNMENT & PEDAL STANCE WIDTH...

Posted on May 30, 2018

KNEE PAIN, KNEE ALIGNMENT & PEDAL STANCE WIDTH BACKGROUND In the last article, we spoke in-depth about crank-arm length and how crankarms that are too-long can cause knee-pain. In this article, we will be concentrating on Pedal Stance Width and why this is important. This article focuses more on road bikes and Tri/TT bikes since they have close to the same bottom bracket shell widths and use similar if not the same cranks with q-factors right around 146mm. MTB’s, on the other hand offer different crank width q-factors such as 168mm, 175mm, 176mm, and even wider. TERMINOLOGY First, let’s define several terms… PEDAL WIDTH vs. (PEDAL) STANCE WIDTH vs. Q-FACTOR. These terms are often used interchangeably but really have different meanings. Following is their correct (cycling) definitions. -PEDAL WIDTH (not shown in Figure 1 to the right) is the distance from the center of the pedal to the outside of the closest crankarm. Standard road pedal width is 53mm. -STANCE WIDTH (or pedal stance width) is the distance between the center of one pedal to the center of the...

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HOW TO PAIR ROTOR INPOWER POWER METERS TO A GPS HEAD UNIT...

Posted on Nov 8, 2017

THE TRICK TO PAIR A ROTOR POWER METER I see a lot more ROTOR Power Meters lately. From my experience, the new INPOWER and 2INPOWER work flawlessly. But, I have heard from many cyclists that they can’t get them paired to their head unit. So, here’s the trick to pair a ROTOR power meter. Currently, ROTOR makes 2 Power Meters. INPOWER, which is a single sided power meter, and 2INPOWER, which is a dual-sided power meter. These power meters are offered only with a 30mm crank spindle. The reason is that more room is available inside a 30mm spindle than a BB86 (24mm) spindle. Inside the spindle is where ROTOR inserts the electronics. But, for those that have a BB86 bottom bracket (example GIANT TCR ADVANCED), don’t worry, Wheels Manufacturing/Enduro Bearings makes bottom bracket bearings that will insert into your BB86 bb shell and allow you to run a BB30-type crank (SKU BB86-30-BB). See pictures. So, back to the original concern … Why is it so hard to get the ROTOR power meter paired to a head unit? It’s actually...

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HOW SHOULD YOU TRAIN FOR A TOUR DE FRANCE CYCLING TOUR?...

Posted on Aug 18, 2017

This summer, I took a bucket-list cycling trip to France to ride on many of the roads – including many of the most famous climbs – featured in the Tour de France. After my return, I’ve been asked about the trip, and my preparations for it, by many cycling friends. So I decided to write an article detailing a few tips you, too, might benefit from if you decide to check this or a similar ride off your own cycling bucket list. Quick Trip Details The trip we took was from a tour company called Custom Getaways. They have numerous trip packages keyed on grand tours and other marquee events, including the Tour de France (TdF), Giro d’Italia and the World Cycling Championships. Our trip was very professionally supported, and our package included riding on the actual roads that the pros ride in the TdF. We climbed: Alpe d’Huez. A beyond-category (HC) 13.8km (8.6-mile) climb at 8.1% average grade, with 1,135m (3,725 ft) of elevation gained – 725m (2,379 ft) to 1860m (6,102 ft). Col d’Telegraphe & Col d’Galibier....

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How Can I Get Better At HILLS?

Posted on Jun 7, 2016

The most common question that I get is “how can I get better at doing hills?” The answer to this is in 3 parts; 1) Change your gearing CASSETTE: Probably the easiest of the ‘big-3’ to implement, especially with Shimano’s new 68xx and 90xx derailleurs that can handle larger cassette gears right out of the box. For larger gearing, the CS-6800 offers several viable options, 11-28T, 14-28T and 11-32T. Since the CS-9000 includes several sprockets made from titanium, it is considered a racing cassette, therefore, it has fewer options. 11-28T and 12-28T are its largest offerings. I recommend the Ultegra CS-6800 as the best price/performance. 11-28T: 11-12-13-14-15-17-19-21-23-25-28 (my configuration) PROs: Gives a good spread in gearing. 11T for go fast and 28T for climbing CONs: From 15 to 25, there is a 2 gear jump and from 25 to 28 there is a 3 gear jump.   14-28T: 14-15-16-17-18-19-20-21-23-25-28 PROs: Also known as junior gearing which makes it USAC legal for juniors who run a 52 front chainring. Gives the tightest group of gearing. CONs: From 21 to 25...

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Stretching & Core Strengthening eBook for Cyclists & Triathletes...

Posted on May 28, 2016

Do you want to be a better cyclist and/or triathlete? Want to be faster, stronger and pain-free while cycling? Stretching & Core Strengthening for the Cyclist can help! Last count, there are over a million stretching and strengthening exercises, so how do you know which ones will help you the most for cycling? This eBook looks at stretching & core strengthening specifically for the cyclist and triathlete. {Click here to order through thepartsshoppe.com}   STRETCHING & CORE STRENGTHENING includes 58 pages of targeted stretching and strengthening exercises comprising 15 stretching and over 32 core and strength exercises geared to target the muscles that are overused as well as those that are underused in cycling and running. Also included are over 95 photographs showing exercises with proper form and several charts and tables that discuss what functions the different ‘cycling’ muscles perform and the results of having tight, short or weak muscles. The E-book is divided into a STRETCHING section and a CORE/STRENGTHENING section that will definitely help make you a faster and stronger cyclist, runner, triathlete. BACKGROUND This e-book...

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Correct Pedal Stroke? The Efficient Biomechanics of Pedaling...

Posted on May 9, 2016

A REVIEW OF WHAT’S THE CORRECT PEDAL STROKE? From time to time, we have to step back from our daily habits and analyze one thing – in this case, it’s all about pedaling. On the surface, it seems pretty basic, just turn the cranks around with your legs, push as hard as you can for as long as you can. Deep diving into this simple issue brings many complexities. Knowing how these complexities work hand-in-hand with each other can actually make you faster on the bicycle by being more efficient. So let’s get started; Ric H is concerned about his pedal stroke, leg alignments and foot position and writes; “I’ve noticed over the 14 years that I’ve been riding a road bike that I’ve changed the alignment of my legs from splayed out to in toward the top tube and my feet from heels up to heels down. Please take some time to explain the advantages of certain leg alignments and foot positions and how this impacts my pedal stroke.”   A good bike fit is essential! First off,...

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WHAT CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT ROTOR (Q / QXL) RINGS?

Posted on Apr 29, 2016

As a Bike Fitter and USA Cycling Coach, one thing I get asked all of the time is “what can you tell me about ROTOR Q-Rings and will they work for me?” The short answer is yes. Q-Rings will work for most people, but, there are several exceptions which I will go over later. For those that don’t know what a ROTOR Q-Ring is, it is an elliptical chainring that helps increase your performance by varying drive-train resistance during pedaling. ROTOR’s elliptical rings maximize the strong muscles and minimize resistance during the weaker part of the pedal stroke. During one complete revolution of the crank, the cyclist experiences 2 ‘dead spots’. One is located at top-dead-center (TDC), the other at bottom-dead-center (BDC). This occurs at these 2 spots because you are not pushing anymore on the down stroke leg but not yet pulling up for the up stroke. In other words, these 2 points in the pedal stroke are where you are transitioning from pulling to pushing muscles on the ‘upper leg’, and transitioning from pushing to pulling muscles...

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